Music played during passing periods to ‘promote positive environment’

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Music played during passing periods to ‘promote positive environment’

The hallways are empty in the morning at about 7:50 a.m. before the music starts at 7:55 a.m.

The hallways are empty in the morning at about 7:50 a.m. before the music starts at 7:55 a.m.

Jacqueline Sumida

The hallways are empty in the morning at about 7:50 a.m. before the music starts at 7:55 a.m.

Jacqueline Sumida

Jacqueline Sumida

The hallways are empty in the morning at about 7:50 a.m. before the music starts at 7:55 a.m.

Starting this year, DGS will play music in the hallways before first period on late-start Mondays and after eighth period on Fridays. The music on Mondays will be shuffled from an iPod and come in a variety of genres. Friday music will be “Mustang Sally” by Wilson Pickett.

This idea came from two students, seniors Gillian Musial and Grace Schultheis. Schultheis spoke on where their inspiration came from.

“The idea actually came from a leadership conference that Gillian [Musial] and I for ACE [Athletes Committed to Excellence], and it was on promoting a positive school environment. We thought that adding music to the morning time before school around 7:40 to the first bell to try and help make students a little more happy in the morning,” Schultheis said. 

According to Jennifer Martinez, Schultheis and Musial made the first playlist that was tested out during homecoming week. Plans in the future include the playing music each morning starting at 7:56 a.m. and ending at 7:59 a.m., shortly before the first-period bell.

During homecoming week the music stayed the same every day. First was 20 seconds of “Old Town Road” by Lil Nas X followed by “Year 3000” by the Jonas Brothers.

As the morning music started to be played daily, students started to voice their opinions about it. Junior Alexis Pragides spoke on her feelings about the music variety.

“It’s good music. It’s a throwback. I like the Jonas Brothers, and that’s better than hearing a lot of stuff that’s overplayed on the radio all the time,” Pragides said.

“Mustang Sally” has been played and sung by the DGS choir program in previous years. Martinez spoke about what the song meant to our school community.

“It just connects to us, it’s part of our story and part of our tradition. It represents our spirit,” Martinez said.

After the homecoming test run, administration will see what problems the system has and decide how the hallway music plan will be solidified.

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