Staff editorial: PDA? No way.

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Staff editorial: PDA? No way.

This is Jacob and Sarah. Do not be like Jacob and Sarah.

This is Jacob and Sarah. Do not be like Jacob and Sarah.

Alex Miranda

This is Jacob and Sarah. Do not be like Jacob and Sarah.

Alex Miranda

Alex Miranda

This is Jacob and Sarah. Do not be like Jacob and Sarah.

It’s 7:58 a.m. and DGS students are crowding the hallways. Most are aware of the time, wrapping up their conversations in an effort to make it to first period before the bell. However, there are always those students that choose to, instead of wrap up their morning activities, get wrapped up in each other… literally.

Come on people, we just got here.

Public displays of affection, or “PDA,” are physical, romantic interactions between couples. It’s unavoidable at DGS: lockers, stairwells, water fountains– no location is safe. Due to the rise of PDA at DGS, many are questioning whether or not it is ethical to engage in these acts of affection without the consent of those around them.

Simply put, it’s off-putting. Students are required to attend school, but they should not be forced to witness a straight-to-DVD romance flick every passing period. This is an educational setting, not an intimate one.

There is a time and place for PDA, neither of which is found within the walls of DGS.

It is clear students are affected by PDA, especially when it interrupts the regular routine of their school day. Sophomore Teagan Smith feels PDA disturbs her daily schedule.

“Last year, a couple used to make out in front of my locker, and I would have to wait for them to leave before I could open it,” Smith said.

PDA’ers disagree with Smith. “We’re in love!” “Why are you jealous of us?” “Just be happy for our relationship!” they whine.

Yes, we are happy for you. We’re glad you found someone you think you love. We just don’t want to see you sucking face while we’re walking to English.

DGS students should take it upon themselves to practice greater restraint in school and respect the space of those around them.

Time to unwrap this issue.

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